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Kirby Kosmos

We are finally back again after a longish summer break with episode 48 full of plugins, articles, tools, and other links.

❤️ Kirby in the wild 1

Websites created with Kirby out in the wild are always a great source of inspiration and show that with its flexibility and extensibility there are hardly any limits to what you can create with Kirby.

Fridays for Future Austria

🧩 Kirby plugins

  • Kirby 3 Donuts is a plugin for creating SVG donut (and pie) charts.

  • Register custom methods without Kirby's plugin wrapper with a little help from the Kirby Method Folder plugin.

  • Have more control over how footnotes are rendered with the Kirby Footnotes plugin.

  • Easily create JSON Schema structured data with Kirby 3 Schema.

  • Kirby Adsense brings Google AdSense Analytics to Kirby 3.

  • Kirby Wrappers lets you wrap text content in configurable divs or other HTML elements.

  • With Kirby 3 Page SQLite you can cache the content file using SQLite.

Always test third-party plugins thoroughly before using them in production. Note that we do not test plugins we list here.

Kirby in the wild 2

Fontwerk, type foundry

😋 Kirby Cookbook

Kirby articles

In his article PHP code typing with Kirby CMS, Florens Verschelde explains how to make auto-completion work with Kirby in your IDE.

More "Built with Kirby"

  • Southplug: A platform that aims to create, share and display ideas/projects related to electronic music and art, from the south of the world.

  • Sunlight: Company website.

Analytics alternatives

While not tracking visitors at all is obviously the best way to protect your visitor's privacy, sometimes you probably have good reasons to do so. So here are some open-source, self-hosted alternatives to the omnipresent Matomo platform that let you keep full control of the data and offer more privacy for your website visitors:

  • Umami: Requires a server with node.js installed.
  • Open Web Analytics: PHP-based application.
  • Shynet: Python-based application (not for everyone, they say themselves), no cookie.
  • Fathom: Needs Go and npm installed on the server. Uses anonymous cookie.

Do you use any of these tools? Share your experiences on the forum.

Performance

Common website performance metrics like First Contentful Paint etc. are not meaningful to everyone. Scott Jehl explores what more inclusive performance metrics could take into account.

HTML, CSS etc.

In The Thing with Leading in CSS Matthias Ott explains why vertical rhythm of text often looks so different between design and implementation.

From the very basics to using the most advanced features HTML, CSS and JavaScript have to offer, while catering for each and every user, that is the beauty of progressive enhancement.

Should new links open in a new window at all? This is a question that is often discussed between clients and developers. But if you must open links in a new tab/window, it is important to inform users about it. Scott Vinkle explains why.

Tools

Vectornator is a vector graphic design software for Mac, iPad and iPhone. It's currently free, but as in many other cases, it's probably not going to stay that way or go away.

Kool Report is an open-source PHP Reporting Framework for faster and easier data report delivery.

Dockle aims to help you build best-practice, secure Docker images

Git Special

Gitify lets you see your GitHub notifications right on your menu bar. The app is available for Mac OS, Windows and Linux.

Show uncommited, untracked and unpushed changes in multiple Git repositories, even multiple levels down from the current directory with mgitstatus.

Gitui is a terminal tool for git that currently doesn't offer the full git feature set, but aims to make some things easier if you use git from the command line.

Like the tools mentioned above, git-fuzzy is an interactive CLI interface for git.

Nicholas C. Zakas shares what you can do to safely use GitHub actions in organizations.

Do you use git from the command line? Do you have any favorite tools that make your live easier? Share them with us on the forum!

This & That

If you use Visual Studio Code as your favorite editor and like seeing what other people use, Pawel Grzybek might have some tips for you.

Still fighting with the command line? Here are some "stupid bash tricks".

Answering an email in a rush, agreeing to something you haven't really thought through, it happens all too often: if you want to improve, add a delay.